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Brochette à légumes {vegan, gluten-free}

July 6, 2017

 

This idea isn't original but it intrigues me and I think about every time I walk through a farmers market.  A colorful pinwheel of root and cruciferous vegetables nestled in a squash puree atop a buttery herb crust.  Amazing how beautiful food can be. I created this tart after one of those mornings at the farmer's market where absolutely everything looked amazing and I came home with way more than planned.  I know, third world problems.  I admit this recipe takes some time and patience but it is worth the effort.  Like an artist in the studio all day that comes out with a beautiful piece in the end.  Enjoy the process and eat the rewards of a job well done.  Choose to be extraordinary. This recipe shows that no matter who you are, you can overcome obstacles with imagination and focus. This is the practice of good food – finding the right combination of flavors that uncover novel approaches to the palate. Learning how to see the possibilities is essential because it is the invisible details that shape the plate.  I would love to see what you come up with. Let me know if you make this and how it turns out. Tag a photo at #theverdantplate on Instagram. Enjoy!

 

Vegetable Pinwheel Tart

 

Ingredients:

 

Tart

 

Purple cabbage

White cabbage

Rainbow carrots

Radish

Turnip

Rutabaga

Japanese eggplant (the long skinny ones.  If you use a globe eggplant then cut the slices so they are not as wide)

Fresh greens (arugula, kale, chard, etc)

Fresh herbs (thyme, dill, chives, oregano, etc)

Olive oil

Half lemon

Sea salt and pepper

Balsamic reduction (1/2 cup balsamic vinegar reduced to 2 tablespoons)

 

- I don't provide amounts because this recipe will vary based on the types of vegetables you use and the size of the pan you choose.  One of each kind of vegetable should be fine.  Peel and slice thin using a mandolin.  You want the slices thin enough to bend without breaking but not so thin that you can see through them. 

- Slice the cabbage into strips and cut vegetables that are really wide into strips about two inches wide.

- If you are making the balsamic reduction rather than buying it bottled, gently boil the balsamic vinegar uncovered in a small pot until syrupy.  Try using white balsamic vinegar if you have it.

 

Filling

 

1 Winter squash (such as pumpkin, butternut, acorn, etc)

1/4 cup non-dairy butter 

2 tablespoons coconut milk

1 teaspoon sea salt and pepper

 

- Make squash puree.  You have options.  Either peel and cut the squash into cubes and steam until tender.  Or cut in half, coat with olive oil and bake cut side down until tender at 400F for 30-45 min.  

- Either way, you end up with tender squash that you can now puree with butter, salt and pepper.  If the consistency is too thick, add coconut milk until the puree is spreadable.  

- The baked puree will be thicker and more intense in flavor.  The steam method is quicker and will be lighter in texture and flavor.  Up to you.  

- Cool the puree completely before assembling the tart.

 

Crust 

 

1 cup gf flour

1/2 cup non-dairy butter

2 tablespoons non-dairy milk 

1/4 teaspoon sea salt 

 

- Make the crust.  Pulse flour, butter, water and salt in food processor until thoroughly combined. Press evenly into the bottom and sides of pie dish.  Bake at 400F for 10 min until lightly golden and set.  Cool completely.

 

Directions:

 

- Assemble the tart.  Spread 1 cup squash puree evenly over crust.  This will give the vegetables a place to nestle.  It's also a nice surprise when you cut into the tart at serving.  

- Work from the outside in, filling in slices of vegetables in a circle until you reach the center.  Tuck fresh greens and herbs into the veggies, drizzle with olive oil, squeeze lemon juice over tart and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

- Bake at 375F for 50 min until golden and tender.  Cool.  Drizzle with balsamic reduction.   

 

Note:  If you have smoked salt or smoked oil, this is a great place to use it.  The root vegetables and greens are hearty enough to stand up to the smokey flavor and are great together.

 

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